The Utah Farmer

Henager's Business College

TOOL-CHEST DIALOGUE

"It is 'plane' that I love you," he began.

"Is that on the 'level'? she asked.

"Haven't I always been on the 'square' with you?"

"But you have many 'vises,'" she remonstrated.

"Not a 'bit' of it," he asserted.

"What made you 'brace' up?" she quieried coquettishly.

"The fact that I 'saw' you," he replied, with a bow.

"I ought to 'hammer' you for that," she answered saucily.

"Come and sit by me on the 'bench,'" he urged.

Suppose the other should 'file' in;" she murmured. "You shouldn't let your arms 'compass' me."

"I know a preacher who is a good 'joiner,' he suggested, and they rushed off for the license.

-- The Utah Farmer, August 28, 1915

The Naming of the Farm

Why Not Raise More Pure Bred Mares.

FARMERS SHOULD NAME THEIR FARMS.

There is more interest being shown in the naming of our farms this year than ever before. Farms are being named for locality, sentiment, business, and some special industry that may be emphasized upon that farm.

The naming of the farm is the expression of content and happiness. In naming your farm originality is of first importance. Words that go well together without harsh or awkward sounds should be selected. One should be very careful and take plenty of time, and give much thought to this important proposition. It means a great deal to you, and to your children, the future owners of your farm, to have a well selected name; in fact, the members of the family should be consulted before deciding upon a title. The name of your farm is of much more importance that what some people give to the naming of a calf or a colt.

There are some characteristics about each farm that will help suggest a name, or a combination name is often used. Once chosen, the name should become a standard of merit, and be known for the quality of everything produced upon which the name is placed. A well selected name, with an established record for good quality and honest dealings will add much to the sale value of a farm; but it is unusual for this kind of farms to be sold.

-- The Utah Farmer, August 14, 1915